Tag Archives: iPhone


Tech Tip Tuesday: March 11, 2014

Apple releases iOS 7.1 for iPhone, iPad with bug fixes, new features

Summary: The latest version for iPhones and iPads landed on Monday, with new features, user interface tweaks, and a number of bug fixes that aims to appease those who have yet to upgrade.

ios-7-1
(Image: CNET, ZDNet)

Apple has released iOS 7.1, the latest iterative version of its mobile software for its smartphones and tablets.

The software was made available for download on Monday, a week shy of six months after a radically redesigned iOS 7 was released.

The latest software version is compatible with iPhone 4 and later, iPad 2 and later, and iPod touch (5th generation) devices. 

Users of iOS 7 and older versions can upgrade compatible devices over-the-air by navigating to “Software Update” in the “General” section of the device’s settings.

iOS 7.1 includes 41 bug fixes that have plagued some early adopters, along with user interface design tweaks, such as visual changes to the phone dialer and power-off features.

The software also lands with a number of new features, including:

  • CarPlay: formerly known as iOS in the Car, which supports iPhone calling, music, maps, and messaging. It also allows users to control certain functions through iOS’ in-built voice-activated assistance Siri;
  • Siri improvements: Including natural-sounding voices for U.K. English, Australian English, Japanese, and Mandarin Chinese. You can also use it in push-to-talk mode by holding the Home button for the duration of your query;
  • Calendar changes: The list view has returned in month view, and the update has also included country-specific holidays added for many locales;
  • iTunes Radio updates: The radio feature, first introduced in iOS 7, has been updated with new features, including the ability to buy albums over-the-air from “Now Playing”;
  • Accessibility additions: The “parallax” motion feature option now includes Weather, Messages, and multi-tasking user interface animations;
  • Camera settings bolstered: Including a setting that allows users to automatically enable HDR mode for iPhone 5s users;
  • Touch ID improved: The software that controls the biometric reader has been improved to make fingerprint recognition better.

Overall, with its user interface and bug fix improvements, the update is designed above all to resolve some of the initial problems with the software, which some insiders previously reported was rushed in order to land in line with the release of iPhone 5s and 5c smartphones in September.

According to Apple, about 82 percent of all compatible iPhones, iPads, and iPod touch devices are running iOS 7 as of late February, based on App Store data.

As many millions have waited to upgrade until some of the known and well-documented bugs and user interface flaws have been resolved, that figure is expected to rise significantly in the next days.

For those not able to download over-the-air, Windows and Mac users can alternatively connect their compatible iPhones, iPads, and iPod touch devices to iTunes, and upgrade by selecting the “Check for Upgrade” button in their device’s summary window. 

Or, users can download the software bundle (.IPSW) files from Apple’s website for offline installations in the coming hours. (Enterprise users can use Apple’s Phobos server for download links.) 

In past updates, downloads are often slow at first as millions attempt to upgrade at the same time.

Downloading over a Wi-Fi connection is recommended due to the size of the file, and some users may have to delete content from their devices in order to install.

By Zack Whittaker, ZDNet


Tech Tip Tuesday: February 25, 2014

Apple’s Serious Security Issue: Update Your iPhone or iPad Immediately

The security hole in Apple's mobile and desktop operating systems had to do with validating the security certificates that are sent back and forth when you’re establishing a secure connection.
 
The security hole in Apple’s mobile and desktop operating systems had to do with validating the security certificates that are sent back and forth when you’re establishing a secure connection.This week, Apple rushed out a patch for its iOS 7 and iOS 6 operating systems to fix a serious security issue. Before I explain further, let me just say this: If you’ve gotten the prompt to update and you haven’t, do it now. If you’re still running older versions of iOS on your iPhone, iPod, or iPad, update now.

Done? O.K., good.

While you’re at it, go download either Chrome or Firefox for your Mac, and stop using Safari immediately until you see a security update for OS X Mavericks, as well.

In a nutshell, Apple has a security hole in both its mobile and desktop operating systems that could let a malicious hacker jump in on what you think is a secure Web transaction if you’re on a public Wi-Fi network like those at a coffee shop, airport or some other location.

The vulnerability affects SSL/TLS, or Secure Socket Layer and Transport Layer Security. These are the two technologies that supposedly encrypt the conversation between your browser and the server you’re trying to access when you visit a website. They’re represented by an “https” rather than “http” in your browser’s URL bar, and they’re supposed to mean you’ve got a secure browsing session in effect.

In fact, thanks to this bug, it’s very possible you don’t. The problem lies in validating the security certificates that are sent back and forth when you’re establishing a secure connection. Thanks to this flaw, your browser can’t verify the authenticity of an encryption certificate, meaning someone could easily be pretending to be your bank’s website, your doctor’s office site or a credit card application form.

There are excellent posts here and here about the severity, technicalities and potential of the vulnerability.

The update to iOS fixes the problem, but as of now, it’s still an issue on OS X Mavericks (although it may not exist in earlier versions of the operating system) for Macintosh computers. There’s a workaround on your Mac, though — use an alternative browser and avoid public Wi-Fi hotspots until there is a fix. That method won’t work on an iPhone, iPad or iPod, because alternatives like Chrome for iOS use the same security background as Safari.

Yes, by the way, people are deeply suspicious of both the timing of when this bug appeared and how it got there, in light of recent revelations about spying activity by the National Security Agency. I’ve also spoken to one engineer who said the errant line of code that caused the security hole could easily have been a copy/paste error that would have been extremely hard to detect.

In today’s environment, I tend to assume the worst, but the important thing now is to download the patch, watch for the Mavericks fix, and as usual, trust no one.

By: Molly Wood, New York Times


100 Productivity Apps for Real Estate Professionals

Going mobile has never been so easy.

This report includes a series of top 10 lists featuring a range of popular apps that real estate professionals may find useful in boosting their productivity or efficiency as they build up their business.

The apps featured in this report are based on searches of keywords and phrases at apps-ranking site TopAppCharts.com. The app lists include free and paid apps for iPhone and iPad devices.

 

Check out all the cool apps and their descriptions at inmanNews.